The Pro-Inflammatory Effects of Acute Exercise in Children With Sickle Cell Anemia

About the study

Recommendations for exercise prescription currently do not exist for individuals with sickle
cell anemia (SCA) despite the known impact that SCA-related complications has on physical
functioning and fitness. A major barrier to increasing physical activity in SCA is the
concern that the well-described inflammatory effects of exercise could precipitate or
exacerbate complications such as vaso-occlusive pain or airway bronchoconstriction (i.e.
exercise-induced asthma). Although the investigator’s preliminary data suggest that
increasing physical activity may be beneficial rather than harmful in children with SCA, the
pro-inflammatory effects associated with repeated bouts of moderate to vigorous exercise
remain poorly understood in this population. The long term goal is to address the safety and
health impact of regular exercise in children with SCA. This proposal would help establish
the safety of moderate to vigorous intensity exercise in children with SCA and importantly,
will inform the design of future clinical trials focused on exercise training as a
transformative strategy to improve fitness and overall well-being in this population.

Study point of contact

Connie Casale, BS
312-227-4856
ccasale@luriechildrens.org
Robert Liem, MD
312-227-4842
rliem@luriechildrens.org

Locations

4 United States sites

Age

10 to 21 Years

Genotypes

hemoglobin SS

Study type

Observational

Gender

All

Interventions

Other

Compensation

Unknown

participation requirements

– Provide signed and dated informed consent form

– Willing to comply with all study procedures and be available for the duration of the
study

– Male or female, aged 10 years to 21 years old

– Diagnosis of hemoglobin SS or S/Beta0 thalassemia confirmed by hemoglobin
electrophoresis

participation restrictions

– Inability to perform CPET due to physical limitation (e.g. severe hip osteonecrosis or
stroke)

– Enrollment on chronic transfusion program

– History of exercise-induced arrhythmia or syncope

– Diagnosis of asthma, defined as physician diagnosis or use of daily asthma medications

– Known exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, defined as physician diagnosis by exercise
challenge test

– History of any cardiac diagnosis precluding exercise testing, unless cleared by a
cardiologist

– Anything that would place the individual at increased risk or preclude the
individual’s full compliance with or completion of the study

Locations

  • Chicago, Illinois, United States, University of Illinois at Chicago, 60608 [Recruiting]
  • Chicago, Illinois, United States, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, 60611 [Recruiting]
  • New York, New York, United States, Columbia University Medical Center, 10032 [Recruiting]
  • Memphis, Tennessee, United States, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, 38105 [Recruiting]
Last updated 2021-08-02